Coinbase ordered to report 14,355 users to the IRS

Anyone moving more than $20,000 on the platform is subject to the new order

Illustration by Alex Castro / The Verge

Today, Coinbase suffered a major defeat at the hands of the Internal Revenue Service, nearly a year after the case was initially filed. A California federal court has ordered Coinbase to turn over identifying records for all users who have bought, sold, sent, or received more than $20,000 through their accounts in a single year between 2013 and 2015. Coinbase estimates that 14,355 users meet the government’s requirements. The full order is embedded below.

For each account, the company has been asked to provide the IRS with the user’s name, birth date, address, and taxpayer ID, along with records of all account activity and any associated account statements. The result is both a definitive link to the user’s identity and a comprehensive record of everything they’ve done with their Coinbase account, including other accounts to which they’ve sent money.

The order is significantly narrower than the IRS’s initial request, which asked for records on every single Coinbase account over the same period. That request would also have required all communications between Coinbase and the user, a measure the judge found unnecessarily comprehensive.

The government made no claim of suspicion against individual users, but instead argued that the order was justified based on the discrepancy between Coinbase users and US citizens reporting Bitcoin gains to the IRS. Coinbase boasts nearly 6 million customers, but according to a government filing, fewer than 1,000 US citizens have reported cryptocurrency holdings on their taxes.

The ruling has already proven controversial in the Bitcoin world. “We remain deeply unsatisfied with the lack of justification provided by the IRS,” Coin Center’s Peter Van Valkenburgh told The Verge. “Without better rationale for why these specific transactions were suspect, a similarly sweeping request could be made for customer data from any financial institution. It sets a bad precedent for financial privacy.”

Coinbase had vigorously opposed the order on similar grounds, but cast the final ruling as a partial victory. “Although we are disappointed not to be able to entirely defeat the summons,” Coinbase’s David Farmer wrote in a post after the ruling, “we are proud to fight for our customers and in the result we were able to achieve as a small company against a large government agency.”

The company is currently reviewing the order, and intends to notify any affected users before any documents are produced.

Update 11/30, 1:33PM ET: Updated with Coinbase statement.

Cannabis Oil Cures 80-Year-Old Dentist of Stage 4 Metastatic Lung Cancer

Source: AnonHQ

Who Do You Believe? The trillion dollar cancer industry — which claims that chemotherapy and radiation kill cancer cells, save lives, and boost long-term survival rates in terminally-ill cancer patients; OR people who fight and survive cancer — not because of chemotherapy-based cancer ‘treatment’, but because of cannabis oil-based therapy?

Why Should You Believe? While chemotherapy stimulates healthy cells to produce a protein that supports tumor growth and makes the tumor cells resistant to further cancer treatment, the primary psychoactive component of cannabis (TetraHydroCannabinol or THC) causes tumor cells to commit suicide while leaving healthy non-tumor cells unharmed.

 

The Success Story

In 1989, 55-year-old Stan Rutner — then retired dentist running a lucrative mini-storage business — was diagnosed with non-Hodgkin lymphoma. After six months of aggressive and toxic standardized allopathic treatment, Stan was cured; he heaved a sigh of relief since his cancer was in remission. However, he was fighting cancer again in 2011; this time he was diagnosed with stage 4 lung cancer with metastasis to the brain.

After telling him that “Stan was in deep shit”, doctors began to ‘treat’ him with chemotherapy and radiation, gave him just weeks to live and ordered him to take refuge in a hospice; which he entered on August 12, 2011. Barb Rutner, Stan’s wife, recalls:

“Shortly after treatment began, Stan was riddled with weight loss and chronic nausea, debilitating fatigue and was wasting away. After that he was wiped out. He was very thin. So we finished radiation to his brain on June 25, and on July 13 he entered the hospital for the first time with radiation pneumonitis (inflammation of the lungs due to radiation therapy). There were three hospital visits during that time, and on the third they kept him for a week and started him on oxygen 24/7. And then he went into palliative care.”

In an attempt to explore all alternative treatments possible to delay Stan’s somewhat ‘inevitable’ death sentence, the Rutners tried Reiki energy treatments, acupuncture, and even creative visualization; yet nothing worked. That’s when John Malanca, Stan and Barb’s daughter, Corinne’s soon to be husband, looked for cannabis as a possible treatment option to ease Stan’s pain. Stan was dying and had nothing left to lose, so he was ready to give Cannabis a go.

Barb explains what ‘treatment’ was meted out to Stan:

“Corinne and John were becoming interested in medicinal marijuana but we were concerned that Stan was wasting away. He had lost so much weight and so we were anxious to get his appetite improved and help him with the nausea. So Corinne suggested daytime cannabis capsule infused with coconut oil; they’re yellow capsules that he started taking. He started taking those in early November of 2011 and in the beginning, he took about a third of a capsule in the morning, and it was about a week or two later that he was able to give up the extra oxygen that he had had 24/7.”

In just a couple of weeks of starting cannabis, Stan witnessed an incredible turnaround. He gained weight, ditched his walker, dumped his 24/7 oxygen; began exercising, and started getting sound sleep. On January 27, 2013, Stan’s brain MRI showed no evidence of recurrent disease: the stage 4 lung cancer, which had metastasized to his brain two years ago and almost taken his life, was gone. At 80, Stan’s cancer is still in remission…

cannabis-oil-1

Dave Mihalovic, a Naturopathic Doctor who specializes in vaccine research, cancer prevention and a holistic approach to cancer treatment, notes:

No chemotherapy drug has ever actually cured or resolved the underlying causes of cancer. Even what mainstream medicine considers “successful” chemotherapy treatments are only managing symptoms, usually at the cost of interfering with other precious physiological functions in patients that will cause side effects down the road.”

The Success Story II

Stan is not alone. When the 3-year-old Landon Riddle was diagnosed with Leukemia, doctors gave him only 48 hours to live. After Landon’s grandmother suggested that they look into cannabis oil treatment, the family flew to Colorado where cannabis oil treatment was legal. In just days, Landon’s cancer was in remission. Sierra Riddle, Landon’s mother, says:

“It is atrocious that anyone on the planet would be charged for choosing cannabis over pharmaceuticals. Having a sick child is a battle in itself, but making this choice is a whole new world. You’re going to need thick skin, intuition, and a solid teamDon’t waste time making sure every other pharmaceutical does more harm than good. If it feels wrong in your gut, it’s probably wrong.”

Harvard Study: Smoking Cannabis Actually Improves Brain Function

(True Activist) Don’t believe the hype – cannabis is not a gateway drug, it is a medicine. From helping people naturally relieve their anxiety to literally curing cancer (over 100 studies have validated this), the plant is incredibly therapeutic. Because it is classified as a Schedule 1 drug, however, marijuana is still illegal in many U.S. states.

Fortunately, new findings from a study published in Frontiers In Pharmacology seem to support arguments for its decriminalization. Preliminary investigations by medical researchers from McLean Hospital, Harvard Medical School, and Tufts University indicate that pot actually improves cognitive performance.

For the study, entitled “Splendor in the Grass? A Pilot Study Assessing the Impact of Medical Marijuana on Executive Function,” behavioral scientists tracked 24 certified medical marijuana patients over a three-month dosing period. The patients were repeatedly measured for cognitive proficiency through a series of intelligence tests, including the STrrop Color Word Test and Trail Making Test.

Lead researcher, Staci Gruber, is the director of the Marijuana Investigations for Neuroscientific Discovery (MIND) program at McLean Hospital. As KINDLAND reports, her initial report is positive. The first benefit reported is that medical marijuana led to patients excelling at brainteasers with enhanced speed and accuracy.

Says the McLean Hospital report:

“After three months of medical marijuana treatment, patients actually performed better, in terms of their ability to perform certain cognitive tasks, specifically those mediated by the frontal cortex,” explained Gruber.

Study participants also reported improvements in their specific clinical conditions, sleep, and overall health as well as a decreased use of conventional medications, particularly opiates.

“We saw a 42 percent reduction in opioid use,” reported Gruber. “This is significant, particularly for those of us in Massachusetts and other areas of the country where the opioid epidemic is ravaging so many. This preliminary finding certainly warrants deeper and broader investigation.”

Cannabis

Preliminary findings from McLean Hospital, Harvard Medical School, and Tufts University indicate that pot actually improves cognitive performance.

Don’t believe the hype – cannabis is not a gateway drug, it is a medicine. From helping people naturally relieve their anxiety to literally curing cancer (over 100 studies have validated this), the plant is incredibly therapeutic. Because it is classified as a Schedule 1 drug, however, marijuana is still illegal in many U.S. states.

Fortunately, new findings from a study published in Frontiers In Pharmacology seem to support arguments for its decriminalization. Preliminary investigations by medical researchers from McLean Hospital, Harvard Medical School, and Tufts University indicate that pot actually improves cognitive performance.

For the study, entitled “Splendor in the Grass? A Pilot Study Assessing the Impact of Medical Marijuana on Executive Function,” behavioral scientists tracked 24 certified medical marijuana patients over a three-month dosing period. The patients were repeatedly measured for cognitive proficiency through a series of intelligence tests, including the STrrop Color Word Test and Trail Making Test.

Lead researcher, Staci Gruber, is the director of the Marijuana Investigations for Neuroscientific Discovery (MIND) program at McLean Hospital. As KINDLAND reports, her initial report is positive. The first benefit reported is that medical marijuana led to patients excelling at brainteasers with enhanced speed and accuracy.

Says the McLean Hospital report:

“After three months of medical marijuana treatment, patients actually performed better, in terms of their ability to perform certain cognitive tasks, specifically those mediated by the frontal cortex,” explained Gruber.

Study participants also reported improvements in their specific clinical conditions, sleep, and overall health as well as a decreased use of conventional medications, particularly opiates.

“We saw a 42 percent reduction in opioid use,” reported Gruber. “This is significant, particularly for those of us in Massachusetts and other areas of the country where the opioid epidemic is ravaging so many. This preliminary finding certainly warrants deeper and broader investigation.”

The preliminary findings from the McLean Hospital’s pilot study indicates that humans do receive benefits from smoking cannabis that exceed a temporary reduction of pain and/or anxiety. Considering one of the most common arguments against legalizing cannabis for recreational use is that it makes people lazy and stupid, this data has profound implications.

“People are going to use it,” Gruber concluded. “It’s up to us to figure out the very best and safest ways in which they can do that.”